Careers experts don’t fear rise of robots

What will a reliable career look like in 2022?

According to Good Education Group’s 2017 Good Careers Guide, it will be in early education, special education, social work, occupational therapy, speech pathology and audiology.

Though 30,000 positions will be added to these areas, 17,000 will be lost from the professions most in decline: binders, finishers and screen printers, metal engineering process workers, printing assistants, secretaries, and sewing machinists.

Good Education Group chief data analyst Ross White suggested robotics and automation play a role in the above-mentioned jobs’ respective growth and recession. In teaching, for instance, the human element is vital. Technology can enhance but not replace their role. Whereas in, say, office administration, virtual assistants like Apple’s Siri can increasingly usurp basic tasks like scheduling appointments, typing and electronic filing.

As for the other noted professions in decline, White claims they will all ultimately be fully automated. “None of these roles requires human decision-making skills,” he explained.

Though, perhaps screen printers and the like may retrain as Uber drivers? The Guide points out the proliferation of new professions as the result of novel technologies like smartphones. Along with peer-to-peer drivers, jobs as app designers and social media managers are on the rise. In fact, the Guide predicts that nearly 70 per cent of children aged 8-9 will, upon graduation, gain jobs that don’t yet exist.

White added his view on how technology will aid job creation. “With virtual and augmented reality becoming more technologically advanced and the further integration of computers with humans, there are any number of occupations waiting to be invented”.

Will robots help or hinder our jobs in the future? Ross White answers “both” in his interview with Campus Review below.

 

This article originally appeared in Campus Review – Careers experts don’t fear rise of robots

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